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Albert Man Albert Man
Album: Nothing Of Nothing Much
Label: Self Released
Tracks: 6
Website: http://www.albertman.com

Recorded on a 100 year old Dutch barge / floating recording studio owned by Pete Townshend, Nothing Of Nothing Much is Man's second EP, and the follow up to last year's album, Cheap Suit. To call it an album of catchy pop-rock would be an enormous understatement.

The record kicks off with the almost ridiculously upbeat I Feel Like Dancing, a full on toe-tapping singalong track that positively leaps along taking you with it. The song is about the power of music to lift you out of your woes, and this achieves that in spades. It's an ear-worm you won't to leave, and while the vocal style may be reminiscent of Mika, this has a little more bluesy feel to it.

Diamond In The Rough is an eighties throwback, and it is not hard to imagine it pumping out over the end credits of a film from that era. Certainly it's message too, of love versus money, could have come from the Thatcher era, though it's no less topical three decades on. It's a song of bitterness and pathos, but there's a lot of nostalgic beauty within.

We're back on toe-tapping territory with Riding Shotgun, which is a summer festival type song that just begs for the volume to be turned up to eleven. You Had Me At Hello is a ballad performed with Colette Williams, their voices mingling perfectly, ably supported by the violin of Sarah Lynch. A live version closes out the album, proving that this is not just a studio crafted song, but can work just as well on the stage.

Perhaps the strongest track is Do You Think About Me which is full of melancholy. It is full of raw emotion, far more vulnerable than anything else on the EP. It's about past love, and wondering how it might have turned out had things gone differently.

This is a hugely enjoyable EP, full of euphoric moments but counter-balanced with genuine emotion and tenderness. It clearly shows Albert Man as a talent who has the potential to hit the bigtime.

Adam Jenkins