Reviews

Red Dirt SkinnersRed Dirt Skinners
Album: Live In Aberdeen
Label: Self Released
Tracks: 15
Website: http://www.reddirtskinners.com

If you can think of an area that features more modes of transport or checks off more locations than the acoustic spectrum then you're a better person than I. Whilst on the surface it may look like whole genres of music have been put together for the benefit of travel agents, particular those with a US portfolio, there is a far better explanation, folk, blues, Americana, country etc are very good at recognising that life is a journey and that transport and destination make good metaphor.

Ok, I'm prepared to concede that in places metaphor has drifted into cliché, particularly where trucks and trains are concerned and the road across the tracks from one side of the town to the other is a well travelled route, but when it's done as well as this, well, frankly, who cares.

"Live In Aberdeen" is the latest from multi-genrelists, Red Dirt Skinners and boy does it sound like one of those concerts that you wish you had been at and will no doubt meet people that claimed to be there, especially if the album gets all the success that I hope comes due to it.

It's not only a good blend of influences, predominantly Americana and blues, but with distinct contributions for the worlds of folk, country and even light jazz/easy listening, check out their cover of Caro Emerald's "Stuck", it's a good balance of heart wringers and upbeat good time songs, with a few places and vehicles thrown in for good measure.

They taken songs from pretty much all of the preceding albums, thrown a couple of good covers, including "Space Oddity" for Good measure and delivered a show that, no doubt, the people lucky enough to be there were talking about for days and weeks after.

Fortunately for the rest of us, they had the god foresight to record it. "Live In Aberdeen" shows off the duo that is Red Dirt Skinners to their absolute best. This a band being showcased by their ability to deliver in the live environment and it's heart-warmingly good.

Neil King