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Reviews

Amelia Coburn Amelia Coburn
Album: Amelia Coburn EP
Label: Shoebox
Tracks: 4
Website: http://www.ameliacoburn.co.uk

Coming hot on the heels of the (limited edition official "bootleg") Amelia Coburn & Friends live album last year, this new 4 track EP further cements Coburn's position as one of the rising stars of the UK folk scene. Since being nominated for the BBC Radio 2 Young Folk Awards in early 2017, she's already stolen the show at the Cambridge Folk Festival, and is set to do the same this year at Costa Del Folk in Ibiza, and the Mark Radcliffe curated stage at the Knutsford Folk Festival.

With a well-earned reputation for her out-of-left-field covers of artists as varied and eclectic as Bowie, The Clash, and The Sex Pistols, the revelations on her live album were her original compositions. There are two of these on the EP, including the live version of In The Arms Of Morpheus which appeared on the previous album. A song about sleep paralysis may not sound the most joyful of tracks, but it's gorgeous and still a huge highlight.

The lead track is 17th July, inspired by both the Richard Linklater film Before Sunset, and a fleeting but memorable evening she spent in Budapest. The time spent in the studio has had an elevating effect on an already great song. The work of Tony McNally and John Hedley perfectly complements Coburn's playing and vocals, but never threatens to steal the song from under her. For those who love the covers, there are a couple of those as well. Nick Drake's Day Is Done is an accomplished cover, with the ukulele providing a delicate accompaniment that helps give the song a suitable fragility. There is no ukulele on No Surprises, but the sparse piano and stripped down vocal duet with David Benjamin produces goosebumps.

The EP is another successful release, and while a couple of these are going to be very familiar (albeit one with a very different arrangement), this is still a worthy addition to your collection even if you do have the official bootleg. Surely an EP or even full length album of original compositions is inevitable at some point in the not so distant future, and what a treat that will be. For those of you still to be introduced to Amelia Coburn, this is a great place to start. But really if you have yet to fall in love with her music, what's keeping you?

Adam Jenkins